A Beaver Story

A Beaver Story
Back in April of 2015, a very pathetic little baby beaver came into Freedom Center. Smaller than a guinea pig, covered in ticks, thin and dehydrated, we were not sure if he was going to survive. He was found on the Rancocas River by people in their boat. After noticing he was being chased by another large beaver, and then realizing that he was in danger and not being chased by a parent, he was scooped up after he attempted to climb in their boat! We knew a...

Become an Awesome Volunteer!

Become an Awesome Volunteer!
Busy days, we all have them, but at Freedom Center for Wildlife these are our busy months! We are into baby season and already the days are full. As the weather gets warmer our workload increases with every baby squirrel, orphaned nestling bird or injured animal brought to the center. There is a lot that goes into caring for our wildlife patients, whether they are with us for a few days or months. It’s more than just making sure they are fed. Depending on ...

Spring Reminders

Spring Reminders
Rehabilitation centers all over the country are now dealing with lots of baby animals. You can help in many ways just by knowing when to intervene and when to leave the animal alone. Here are some tips to remember. Fawns Fawns are left alone by the mother for many hours at a time. If you see a young fawn alone, laying down in the grass, look to see if it has flies around it. Look at the ears-are they folded over, and is the fawn crying or struggling to b

My First Rescue

My First Rescue
It's very interesting how certain events in your life stick with you and are easier to recall than others. Even though it has been fifteen years, I remember the first time I helped a wild animal in distress like it was yesterday. I had just started volunteering for my local wildlife rehabilitation center and was on my way home after spending four hours feeding baby squirrels and cleaning their enclosures. That first summer I dubbed myself "The Squirrel ...

Helping those who Rescue Animals

Helping those who Rescue Animals
When some people think of wildlife rehabilitation, they only think of the hands-on animal care given and the prospect of that animal being released. But with these tasks comes the responsibility of helping the person who found the animal and educating them with the information needed to help it. One such opportunity came to us two years ago; it began with the best intentions, but due to bad information and no experience with a wild animal, could have tu...